Journal cover Journal topic
Earth Surface Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.649 IF 2.649
  • IF 5-year value: 2.688 IF 5-year 2.688
  • CiteScore value: 2.64 CiteScore 2.64
  • SNIP value: 0.628 SNIP 0.628
  • SJR value: indexed SJR
    indexed
  • IPP value: 1.689 IPP 1.689
  • h5-index value: 6 h5-index 6
ESurf cover
Open access Public peer review Article level metrics Moderate APCs
Managing editor:
Tom
Coulthard
Editors: Niels Hovius, Douglas Jerolmack, Andreas Lang & A. Joshua West
Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of high-quality research on the physical, chemical, and biological processes shaping Earth's surface and their interactions on all scales.
The main subject areas of ESurf comprise field measurements, remote sensing, and experimental and numerical modelling of Earth surface processes, and their interactions with the lithosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and pedosphere. ESurf prioritizes studies with general implications for Earth surface science and especially values contributions that straddle discipline boundaries, enhance theory–observation feedback, and/or apply basic principles from physics, chemistry, or biology.
News
Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

New article processing charges for ESurf 05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

New institutional agreement between the PIK and Copernicus Publications 24 Aug 2017

Authors from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 23 August 2017. The agreement which is valid for the first author enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the PIK and the publisher.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

Here we provide the first results on the evolution of the Ayeyarwady delta, the last unstudied megadelta of Asia. In addition to its intrinsic value as a founding study on the Holocene development of this region, we advance new ideas on the climate control of monsoonal deltas as well as describe for the first time a feedback mechanism between tectonics and tidal hydrodynamics that can explain the peculiarities of the Ayeyarwady delta.

Liviu Giosan, Thet Naing, Myo Min Tun, Peter D. Clift, Florin Filip, Stefan Constantinescu, Nitesh Khonde, Jerzy Blusztajn, Jan-Pieter Buylaert, Thomas Stevens, and Swe Thwin

This article is a contribution to a special issue on "Two centuries of modelling across scales". It describes the historical observations, evolving hypotheses, and early calculations that led to the development of the field of glacial isostatic sdjustment (GIA) modelling, which seeks to understand feedbacks between ice-sheet change, sea-level change, and solid Earth deformation. Recent and future advances are discussed. Future progress will likely involve an interdisciplinary approach.

Pippa L. Whitehouse

The role of mountain uplift and associated silicate weathering in the global climate over geological times is controversial. Previous soil column models suggest that weathering falls at a high denudation rate. We present the results of a 3-D model that couples erosion and weathering, a CO2 consumer during mountain uplift. Our model suggests that the weathering of temporarily stocked colluvium may contribute significantly to the mountain weathering outflux at high denudation rates.

Sébastien Carretier, Yves Goddéris, Javier Martinez, Martin Reich, and Pierre Martinod

Sediments produced by glaciers are transported by rivers and wind toward the ocean. During their journey, these sediments are weathered, and we know that this has an impact on climate. One key factor is time, but the duration of this journey is largely unknown. We were able to measure the average time that sediment spends only in the glacial area. This time is 100–200 kyr, which is long and allows a lot of processes to act on sediments during their journey.

Antoine Cogez, Frédéric Herman, Éric Pelt, Thierry Reuschlé, Gilles Morvan, Christopher M. Darvill, Kevin P. Norton, Marcus Christl, Lena Märki, and François Chabaux

The layer known as the critical zone extends from the tree tops to the groundwater. This zone varies globally as a function of land use, climate, and geology. Energy and materials input from the land surface downward impact the subsurface landscape of water, gas, weathered material, and biota – at the same time that differences at depth also impact the superficial landscape. Scientists are designing observatories to understand the critical zone and how it will evolve in the future.

Susan L. Brantley, William H. McDowell, William E. Dietrich, Timothy S. White, Praveen Kumar, Suzanne P. Anderson, Jon Chorover, Kathleen Ann Lohse, Roger C. Bales, Daniel D. Richter, Gordon Grant, and Jérôme Gaillardet

Publications Copernicus